Tieraona Low Dog, M.D.: Why Soy Isoflavones Don’t Work for Many Menopausal Women

Letter from Tieraona Low Dog, M.D: If you’re like me, you’ve probably noticed that some of your patients get great results from eating soy or taking soy isoflavones for relief of menopausal symptoms. Yet for other patients, these approaches are ineffective. Have You Wondered Why Soy Isoflavones Don’t Always Work?Read …

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Video with Tieraona Low Dog, M.D.: Are You Ready to Change the Discussion around Menopause?

Menopause

Letter from Tieraona Low Dog, M.D.: Menopause is not a disease. It’s a doorway.  As a wholistic clinician with a medical degree, I have great respect for Western medicine. I think we can all agree that few of us would want to have meningitis in a world without antibiotics orRead …

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Prenatal Exposure to Flame Retardants Linked to IQ and ADHD

Propionic acid and autism

Prenatal exposure to flame retardants may be as concerning as lead exposure to children’s brain development. A new study involving Simon Fraser University researchers has found that prenatal exposure to flame retardants can be significantly linked to lower IQs and greater hyperactivity in five-year-old children. The findings are published online today in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. Researchers say their results confirm earlier studies that found PBDEs, which are routinely found in pregnant women and children, may be developmental neurotoxicants. The researchers found that a 10-fold increase in polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) concentrations in early pregnancy, when the fetal brain is developing, was associated with a 4.5 IQ decrement, which is comparable with the impact of environmental lead exposure.

Clues Connect Estrogen and Autoimmune Disease

There is a phenomenon that scientists have yet to solve, regardless of whether a woman lives in the United States, where medical care is relatively good, or third world nations, where medical care is often scarce: women are less likely to die from infectious diseases than men. The lower death rate has been attributed to a beneficial, yet unexplained effect estrogen has on the immune system. Females of child-bearing age are more resistant to infectious disease and have an increased risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). This study hypothesized that estrogen-induced gene expression could establish an immunoactivated state which would render enhanced defense against infection, but may be deleterious in autoimmune development.By Nicholas A. Young, Lai-Chu Wu, et al, Estrogen modulation of endosome-associated toll-like receptor 8: An IFNα-independent mechanism of sex-bias in systemic lupus erythematosus. Clinical Immunology, March 2014

Four Studies & HRT Position Paper from the North American Menopause Society Conference

At the annual meeting in October, 2017 of the North American Menopause Society (NAMS) in Philadelphia, researchers presented a number of valuable studies for your practice: Study 1: Women More Likely to Opt Out of Hormone Replacement Therapy and Choose Alternatives A study, which was the first to examine women’sRead …

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Breast Cancer and DNA Repair Capacity: Multivitamin & Calcium Supplements

Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women, with over 1 million new cases diagnosed
every year worldwide. Over recent decades, considerable interest has emerged regarding whether vitamins and/or other supplements can lower the risk of BC. However, previous epidemiologic studies that investigated the association between intake of multivitamin and supplements of single vitamins and minerals and BC risk have reported conflicting results. Whether vitamins can actually reduce BC risk is still controversial. This study examined whether multivitamin and calcium use was associated with BC incidence and DNA repair capacity (DRC).

Collagen, a better framework than calcium alone

It’s been said that graceful aging is about being flexible. One’s ability to respond mentally and physically to life’s obstacles is certainly an asset. However when it comes to bone health, traditional advice on calcium supplementation favors rigidity over agility. Kathy Lund comments on Ian R Ried’s article, A Case for Ending Calcium, and the age-old advice to prescribe calcium alone fails to address the importance of being lithe for long-term bone health.

Iron Improves Women’s Exercise Performance

It is the first time researchers have been able to confirm that iron supplementation has beneficial effects on exercise performance. Dr Sant-Rayn Pasricha from the Melbourne School of Population and Global Health said the findings could have implications for improved performance in athletes and health and general health and well-being in the rest of the population. “It may be worthwhile screening women, including women training as elite athletes, for iron deficiency, and ensuring they receive appropriate prevention and treatment strategies. Athletes, especially females, are at increased risk of iron deficiency potentially, due to their diets and inflammation caused by excessive exercise,” said Pasricha.