Integrative Psychiatry Effective but Overlooked for Cancer Patients

Nearly three-quarters of cancer patients who have major depression are not currently receiving treatment for depression, and that a new integrated treatment programme is strikingly more effective at reducing depression and improving quality of life than current care, according to three papers published in The Lancet Psychiatry, The Lancet, and The Lancet Oncology. Lead author Professor Michael Sharpe from the University of Oxford in the UK, says “The huge benefit that DCPC delivers for patients with cancer and depression shows what we can achieve for patients if we take as much care with the treatment of their depression as we do with the treatment of their cancer.” By M Sharpe, et al., published in the Lancet and Lancet Oncology, Aug. 2014.

Inactivity Linked to Colon, Lung, Endometrial Cancer

It is widely accepted that physical inactivity leads to weight gain, cardiovascular disease and diabetes. New research links a sedentary lifestyle to certain cancers, specifically colon, lung and endometrial cancer, according to a study published June 16 in the JNCI: Journal of the National Cancer Institute. The research is significance as is shows sedentary behavior is emerging as an independent risk factor for cancer, chronic disease and mortality. However, in a clinical setting guidelines to improve activity levels for adult patients are poorly defined and difficult to implement.

Apathy Aside, Six Factors to Reducing Global Health Risks

The biggest threat to global health and wellness can be narrowed down to six, preventable non-communicable diseases: respiratory illness from tobacco use, harmful alcohol use, salt intake, high blood pressure and blood sugar, and obesity. According to a May 2014 Lancet study, if nations could reduce target levels for these lifestyle related diseases in the next 25 years, 37 million early deaths would be prevented. But by not reaching these targets, an additional 10.5 million deaths would occur as compared to the 28.3 million who died in 2010. And while experts say this could be possible, critics say apathy from leadership is the biggest obstacle to achieving the desired target.