Human Clinical: Selenium Yeast Reduces Oxidative Stress In Men

For the first time ever, researchers have made a significant positive connection between biomarkers of oxidative sress, a standardized form of selenium-enriched yeast and reduced prostate cancer risk. Results from long-term clinical trial suggest that selenium-enriched yeast (SY), in a dose-dependent, standardized form from SelenoExcell, but not selenomethionine (SeMet) may be effective at reducing prostate cancer risk. This study confirmed reductions in biomarkers of oxidative stress following supplementation with the standardized form of SY but not SeMet in healthy men. By John P Richie Jr PhD, Karam el-Bayoumy PhD et al, published in Cancer Prevention Research, August 2014.

Link Between Artificial Sweeteners and Diabetes

Pink, yellow, or blue? Each of these non-caloric sweeteners may be contributing to the global epidemic of diabetes. The study published in Nature today (Sept. 17, 2014), shows the non-nutritive sweeteners, saccharin, sucralose and aspartame, could actually hasten the development of glucose intolerance and metabolic disease. The mechanism is surprising: these no-calorie sweeteners change the composition and function of gut microbiota. The researchers found the results so compelling they went so far as to call for a reassessment of non-nutritive sweeteners. By Eran Segal, Eran Elinav, published in Nature, Sept. 17, 2014.

Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Disease: Treatment With Natural Supplements

Mitochondrial Dysfunction and Chronic Disease

It is well known among researchers that mitochondrial genetic or primary mitochondrial disorders contribute to mitochondrial dysfunction as well as secondary or acquired degenerative disorders. This review will concentrate on nongenetic or acquired mechanisms that could explain mitochondrial dysfunction and their replacement treatment with natural supplements and combinations of natural supplements, including vitamins, minerals, enzyme cofactors, antioxidants, metabolites, transporters, membrane-type phospholipids, and other natural supplements. Combinations of supplements can reduce significantly the fatigue and other symptoms associated with chronic disease and can naturally restore mitochondrial function, even in long-term patients with intractable fatigue. By Garth Nicholsen, PhD, published in Alternative Therapies Health Med. 2014, Vol. 20, Suppl. 1.

Case Study: A Novel Approach to Thyroid and Adrenal Therapy

This case study represents a common problem for integrative-care physicians. Where do you start with a patient with multiple symptoms that may be complicated by previous drug therapies. “One of the many challenges for any physician is determining the correct course of treatment for patients with more than 1 area of complaint. Should the physician treat the symptoms or the underlying cause of a condition?,” writes Christopher Wellwood MS, DC and Sean Rardin, MD. This case study of a 49-year old patient with multiple symptoms, including a goiter, as well as hyperlipidemia; multiple joint pains; alopecia; fatigue; bilateral, lowerextremity edema; and severe gastric disruption with bloating and acid reflux. By Wellwood, Rardin, published in Integrative Medicine a Clinicians Journal, June 2014.

Men’s Health Sheds Fills Health Gender Gap

Marriage is good for men’s health, according the the latest National Health Interview Survey. It’s not surprising that spouses encourage men to see the doctor more frequently than they would otherwise. But what about men who are not married but living with a partner? They are even less likely than other non-married men to see a physician for preventive health care. Short of a marriage license, the way to get more men to pay attention to their health may lie in a novel approach that appeals to males desires to be useful, give back and be a part of club. In Australia, these are called Men’s Health Sheds, and they could provide a way to improve men’s physical and mental health.

Group-dietary Intervention and Gestational Weight Gain Among Obese Women

Obese women can have control over their weight gain during pregnancy using conventional weight loss techniques, according to a new study in Obesity. Interventions include attending weekly group support meetings, seeking advice about nutrition and diet, and keeping food and exercise journals. Results of the Healthy Moms study also show that obese women who limit their weight gain during pregnancy are less likely to have large-for-gestational age babies, which can complicate delivery and increase the baby’s risk of becoming obese later in life. By Kimberly K Vesco et al, published in Obesity, Aug. 28, 2014.